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Voter Education: "The Personhood Amendment"

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Initiative #26 “Be it Enacted by the People of the State of Mississippi: SECTION 1. Article III of the constitution of the state of Mississippi is hearby amended BY THE ADDITION OF A NEW SECTION TO READ: SECTION 33. Person defined. As used in this Article III of the state constitution, “The term ‘person’ or ‘persons’ shall include every human being from the moment of fertilization, cloning or the functional equivalent thereof.”


BALLOT TITLE: Should the term “person” be defined to include every human being from the moment of fertilization, cloning, or the equivalent thereof? BALLOT SUMMARY: Initiative #26 would amend the Mississippi Constitution to define the word “person” or “persons,” as those terms are used in Article III of the state constitution, to include every human being from the moment of fertilization, cloning, or the functional equivalent thereof.
Fiscal Analysis Prepared by the Mississippi Legislative Budget Office There is no determinable cost or revenue impact associated with this initiative.
The Argument FOR the Initiative by Brad Prewitt, Executive Director of the Yes on 26 Campaign Coalition The Mississippi Personhood Amendment recognizes in our law that each individual human being has an ‘unalienable’ right to life from its biological beginning until natural death. When does life begin? Dr. Fritz Baumgartner of UCLA School of Medicine states: “Every human embryologist worldwide states that the life of the new individual human being begins at fertilization.” The Bible tells us that God created humans “in his own image,” thereby making human life sacred. Finally, the Constitution and the Declaration both ensure the fundamental right to life to all persons, without which all other rights are meaningless. However, current Mississippi law does not protect an unborn child from being destroyed by his or her mother’s choice or as part of a scientific experiment, because the unborn child is not legally classified as a “person.” In Roe v. Wade the Supreme Court noted that if the “personhood (of the preborn) is established, the (abortion rights) case . . . collapses, for the fetus’ right to life is then guaranteed specifically” in the Constitution. But, for the thirty eight years since Roe, the legal rights of personhood have been denied both to babies formed inside the womb and to those outside the womb by way of “cloning” and embryonic stem cell experimentation. By voting “Yes on 26” we can amend our State Constitution and be the first in the nation to protect every human being from the very beginning of life, whether that life begins by natural or artificial means. By recognizing the personhood of our tiniest brothers and sisters, we will ensure that the preborn receive equal protection under the law regardless of their size, location, developmental stage or method of reproduction.
The Argument AGAINST the Initiative by Lynn Evans, Public Health Advocate Sometimes an idea that seems promising has disastrous consequences. This is true for the Personhood Amendment. In the 33 years since the first in vitro baby, hundreds of Mississippi couples who just wanted a baby of their own have thanked medical science for in vitro fertilization [IVF]. The treatment requires “harvesting” the mother’s eggs, fertilizing the eggs outside the womb, and implanting the best one or two zygotes back into the womb. There, with luck, they will develop into healthy babies. Since more than two eggs are harvested for IVF but only the best two candidates are usually implanted, what happens to the other fertilized eggs if they are defined as people? Can they be frozen, as is usually done? If frozen fertilized embryos are people, can they inherit property? Medicine defines a pregnancy as an implanted egg. If a fertilized egg in a petri dish were to be defined as a person by passage of the Personhood Amendment, it is very likely that IVF would no longer be an option in Mississippi – especially for couples at risk for having a baby with a life-threatening genetic defect who now can choose IVF and have a healthy baby. Not only would Mississippi couples who just want a baby be denied the option of IVF, certain forms of birth control – like IUDs – would be suddenly illegal, and miscarriages could become suspect. Effective treatment of severe preeclampsia, molar gestation, and early ectopic pregnancies would be jeopardized by passage of the Personhood Amendment, threatening women’s lives. New stem cell treatments for patients with Parkinson’s disease, Lou Gehrig’s disease, and cancers like leukemia and choriocarcinoma are also at risk. If it were your friend or family member who needed the best treatment available, would you deny it to them? Vote NO on the Personhood Amendment.]]]]> ]]>

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COVID-19

749 new COVID-19 cases reported Friday in Mississippi

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More than a half-million new COVID-19 cases were reported in the U.S. this past week in what is being reported as the worst week since the crises began. The 14-day average for cases saw an increase of 42% while deaths increased by 16%. Hospitalizations have exploded by 46%.

In Mississippi, the seven-day average for new cases is hovering just below 800, while hospitalizations remained fairly flat.

The Mississippi State Department of Health reported five new COVID-19 cases Friday in Warren County and no new deaths. The cumulative number of cases in Warren County to date is 1,571, and the county’s death toll is 56.

Statewide, MSDH reported 749 new COVID-19 cases Friday, bringing the total cumulative confirmed cases in Mississippi to 119,336. The seven-day average of new cases is 780, higher by 263 cases from a month ago.

Most new cases are seen in younger people recently, and they are more likely to survive the virus than those 65 and older. By far, the age group reporting the most cases in Mississippi are young people from 18 to 29 years old.

MSDH reported Friday that 18 additional Mississippians died of COVID-19 statewide. The cumulative number of deaths in the state is 3,328. The state’s rate of deaths to confirmed cases is about 2.8%.

Deaths are a lagging indicator. While July saw the highest number of new cases since the crisis began, August saw the highest number of deaths. The highest number of deaths in any one day was 67 reported Aug. 25.

Of the 18 deaths MSDH reported Friday, five occurred between Oct. 14 and Oct. 28 in the following counties:

County Deaths reported Friday
Harrison 1
Itawamba 1
Jackson 1
Simpson 1
Tippah 1

Thirteen COVID-19 related deaths occurred between July 31 and Oct. 25, identified from death certificate reports.

County Deaths identified from death certificate reports
Chickasaw 1
Copiah 1
Forrest 1
Grenada 1
Hancock 1
Harrison 1
Jackson 1
Jefferson Davis 1
Marshall 1
Monroe 1
Oktibbeha 1
Sunflower 1
Yazoo 1

New cases and deaths were reported to MSDH as of 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29. MSDH usually reports statistics on the COVID-19 coronavirus each day based on the previous day’s testing and death reports.

The primary metric concerning state health officials are the numbers of people hospitalized, and that number rose steadily with the rise of new cases in July and August. On June 6, the number of Mississippians hospitalized with confirmed cases of COVID-19 was at 358. Hospitalizations nearly tripled by late July. They leveled off in early August and began noticeably dropping in the middle of the month including critical cases and numbers of people requiring ventilators. Hospitalizations continued to drop in September but levelled off at the middle of the month. They dropped again through Oct. 3; however, hospitalizations began rising since then. They have leveled off this week.

The number of Mississippians hospitalized for the virus as of 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29, is 712, more than half of the late July peak of about 1,200. The number includes 609 with confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 103 people with suspected but unconfirmed cases. Of those with confirmed infections, 173 were critically ill and in intensive care units and 72 were on ventilators.

Source: MSDH

MSDH has estimated the number of people who can be presumed recovered from COVID-19 in Mississippi. That number is 101,336 through Sunday, Oct. 25. This figure is updated weekly. It represents about 85% of the cumulative 119,336 cases reported as of Friday, Oct. 30.

The number of cases in Warren County three weeks ago, Friday, Oct. 9, was 1,459, therefore the estimated number of people presumed recovered in the county is 1,403, or about 89.3% of the 1,571 cumulative cases reported as of Friday, Oct. 30. The county has an estimated 112 active cases.

These estimates are based on MSDH’s guidelines for calculating estimated recoveries when hospitalizations are not known, using the number of cases 21 days ago, less known outcomes (deaths).

The total number of Mississippians tested for COVID-19 (PCR and antigen tests identifying current infections) as of Saturday, Oct. 24 (the latest testing results reported by MSDH), is 1,002,327 or about 33.7% of the state’s 2.976 million residents. Without an updated number of tests, it is impossible to accurately calculate Mississippi’s positivity rate (positive results to tests, seven-day average), however, the rate was 6.9% Thursday, according to Johns Hopkins University. The national rate is 6.3%, and 5% or lower indicates adequate testing.

The total number of outbreaks in long-term care facilities was 131 Friday. About 39.3%, or 1,319, of the state’s total deaths were people in long-term care facilities.

A total of 26 deaths in Warren County were residents of LTC facilities.

MSDH is no longer reporting outbreaks in individual long-term care facilities in Mississippi and has replaced it with access to a database from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. You can access and search the data here. The latest data available is for the week ending Oct. 18.

For additional information, visit the MSDH website.

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Crime

Suspect in LD’s Kitchen fatal shooting still at large

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James Earl Winters (photo courtesy VPD)

The Vicksburg Police Department continues its search for James Earl Winters, 29, of Vicksburg, in connection with the death of Wade Carter, Jr.

Carter was shot twice in the abdomen at LD’s Kitchen, 1111 Mulberry St., Oct. 6, and died of wounds Oct. 9. Two other victims were also shot at the time but survived their injuries.

Anyone having information concerning Winters’ whereabouts is asked to contact the Vicksburg Police Department at 601-636-2511 or Crime Stoppers at 800-355-8477 (800-355-TIPS).

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COVID-19

Vicksburg mayor extends COVID-19 restrictions and mandates another month

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Vicksburg Mayor George Flaggs Jr. during July 15 news conference. (Photo by Thomas Parker)

Friday, Mayor George Flaggs, Jr. extended the city’s COVID-19 restrictions and mandates for an additional 30 days.

The extension also applies to the juvenile curfew and the special crime task force previously put in place by the city.

The following is a summary of the new proclamation:

RETAIL BUSINESSES

Face Coverings are still required in the City of Vicksburg inside all retail businesses, including grocery stores, building supply stores, cigar shops, convenience stores, liquor stores, and any other store that sells items to the public. However, maximum capacity may go back to 100% as long as strict social distancing, 6 feet separation, can be ensured between persons who are not in the same household.

RESTAURANTS & BARS

Face coverings are still required of employees and customers while not eating or drinking. Maximum capacity may go back to 100 % as long as strict social distancing can be maintained between tables and parties/groups. Limit of 10 to a table. Places that sell alcohol or allow consumption of alcohol on the premises must stop serving, selling or consuming by 11 p.m. and close the business by midnight.

SALONS, BARBER SHOPS, SPAS, MASSAGE PARLORS, TATTOO PARLORS, PERSONAL GROOMING OR PET GROOMERS

Face coverings are still required of employees and customers. Maximum capacity may go back to 100% as long as strict social distancing can be maintained between customers.

GYMS & FITNESS CENTERS

Face coverings are still required and must not exceed 75% capacity. Must clean and disinfect high contact equipment and areas frequently. Hand sanitizer must be available at entrances and exits.

MOVIE THEATERS & AUDITORIUMS

Face coverings are still required and must not exceed 75% capacity. Must clean and disinfect high contact equipment and areas frequently. Hand sanitizer must be available at entrances and exits.

DANCE STUDIOS, LIBRARIES & MUSEUMS, INDOOR RECREATION & PLACES OF AMUSEMENT, OUTDOOR RECREATION & PLACES OF AMUSEMENT

Face coverings are still required indoors and may go back to 100% maximum capacity as long as strict social distancing can be maintained between persons not in the same household.

RECEPTION HALLS AND CONFERENCE CENTERS

Face coverings are still required and may go back to 100% maximum capacity as long as strict social distancing can be maintained between persons not in the same household. For seated dinners only, there shall be at least six (6) feet between tables and a maximum at ten (10) persons at each table.

IN GENERAL

  1. Face Coverings are still required in all businesses, except manufacturing businesses.
  2. Exceptions to the face covering requirement:
    1. Any individual who will not come in contact with any other individual and can maintain social distancing (6 feet apart);
    2. Any child under 8, but strongly encouraged for ages 2-7;
    3. Any individual with a medical condition that prevents wearing a face covering;
    4. Any individual who is consuming food or drinks;
    5. Any individual seeking to communicate with someone who is hearing impaired;
    6. Any individual giving a speech for broadcast or to an audience; and
    7. . Any individual temporarily removing his or her face covering for identification purposes.

GROUP GATHERINGS

All persons in public or private social gatherings/activities shall maintain social distancing of a minimum of 6 feet apart between individuals not in the same household. If indoors, a face covering is required if persons are not able to maintain a minimum of 6 feet separation.

RELIGIOUS SERVICES

Places of worship are encouraged to follow the Safe Worship Guidelines adopted May 20, 2020. Face coverings are encouraged.

Worshipers shall maintain social distancing of a minimum of 6 feet apart between individuals not in the same household.

FUNERALS

Funerals are encouraged to be grave side. May be held at Church or Funeral Home at 11 a.m. or 2 p.m. or at the City Auditorium at 11 a.m. or 2 p.m. All persons shall maintain social distancing of a minimum of 6 feet apart between individuals not in the same household. Upon proof of death due to COVID-19, the cost for the City Auditorium for the funeral shall be one-half of the regular auditorium fee.

JUVENILE CURFEW

The curfew for juveniles 17 and under will remain in place with the exceptions of traveling to or from work, being with a parent or guardian, traveling to or from a legitimate school function or organized youth sport activity.

SPECIAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TASK FORCE

The special law enforcement task force will remain in place on Thursdays through Sundays from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.

BUSINESS SCREENING AND CLEANING

Businesses shall continue to screen employees and customers and disinfect high contact areas.

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