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COVID-19

Vicksburg to begin curfew on Monday among other measures to limit the spread of COVID-19

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Dr. Carlos Latorre, left, waits for his turn to speak at Sunday's press conference. Mayor George Flaggs is at the mic. (Photo by David Day)

Vicksburg Mayor George Flaggs Jr. announced further measures to attempt the spread of COVID-19 coronavirus on Sunday, including a city-wide curfew beginning Monday, March 23, at noon.

“It’s no more business as usual,” the mayor said.

The proclamation was announced during a news conference at the Vicksburg Convention Center on Sunday, March 22, to update the city and county’s response to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

Although no cases have been reported in Warren County, the city will be “as proactive as possible,” he said.

“Let me be clear. Over the coming days and weeks, we will be taking even more steps to save lives and limit the exposure of this virus,” the mayor added.

According to the proclamation, a city-wide curfew will be strictly enforced from 11 p.m. until 5 p.m. beginning Monday. Persons should not be on the public street or in any public place unless it is for traveling to or from work or for medical personnel in the performance of their duties. First responders and law enforcement are exempt from this curfew.

A civil emergency declaration gives the city access to mutual aid, and resources from the state and federal government, Flaggs said.

“We feel confident that we are prepared.”

Dr. Carlos Latorre, State of Mississippi Medicaid director and Mississippi COVID-19 task force member, reiterated many of the guidelines issued by federal and state health authorities. He also said that the jump in cases in Mississippi was expected with more testing.

“As we test more, we expect to find more cases,” he said.

Mississippi is limiting testing to people who are symptomatic for the virus, including having a fever of 100.4 degrees or higher, coughing and difficulty breathing. To preserve resources, people who are well will not be tested at this time.

Latorre emphasized that people should not go to the emergency room if they have symptoms. Call a doctor or clinic in the area to be evaluated. Those with mild symptoms should “stay home and isolate yourself,” he said.

Clinics will pre-screen before making an appointment, asking whether you’ve been exposed to the virus, for example. If you don’t feel well and want to see your doctor, you will be seen, he added. “Be patient and help us not to spread the virus.”

“Some people say, ‘this is just like the flu,’” Latorre said before making it clear that COVID-19 is not the same, even if symptoms are similar.

“The virus is more contagious than the regular flu,” he said, adding that COVID-19 is two and half times more contagious.

“We also have medication for the flu,” he said, and there are no medications proven effective against COVID-19. Some drugs are being tested, but they are not available for the virus, yet.

A vaccine is in trials, Latorre said, he expects it to be ready in 12 to 18 months.

“A lot of smart people working really hard on it,” he said.

Keep washing your hands and practice social distancing, Latorre advised.

Flaggs reiterated that the city and county are working together on the procedures to be implemented during the crisis. If it is necessary to extend the procedures enacted after 14 days, he will.

In addition to Flaggs and Latorre, officials on hand were Warren County Board of Supervisors President Jeff Holland, Warren County Sheriff Martin Pace, Warren County Emergency Management Director John Elfer, Vicksburg Fire Chief Craig Danczyk and Vicksburg Police Chief Milton Moore.

View the entire news conference on our Facebook page.

Also, read the full City of Vicksburg civil emergency proclamation.

For more information on COVID-19, visit the MSDH website.

 

COVID-19

Mississippi’s seven-day average for new COVID-19 cases remains over 600 Monday

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Sunday and Monday saw the expected weekend drop in reported new COVID-19 cases and deaths. Mississippi’s seven-day average remains above 600.

The Mississippi State Department of Health reported three new COVID-19 cases Sunday in Warren County and no new cases Monday. No new deaths were reported either day. The cumulative number of cases in Warren County to date is 1,470, and the county’s death toll is 53.

Statewide, MSDH reported 294 new COVID-19 cases Sunday and 296 cases Monday, bringing the total cumulative confirmed cases in Mississippi to 105,228. The seven-day average of new cases is 646, higher by 197 cases from a month ago.

Most new cases are seen in younger people recently, and they are more likely to survive the virus than those 65 and older. By far, the age group reporting the most cases in Mississippi are young people from 18 to 29 years old.

MSDH reported Sunday that five additional Mississippians died of COVID-19 statewide. No new deaths were reported Monday. The cumulative number of deaths in the state is 3,101. The state’s rate of deaths to confirmed cases is about 3%.

Deaths are a lagging indicator. While July saw the highest number of new cases since the crisis began, August saw the highest number of deaths. The highest number of deaths in any one day was 67 reported Aug. 25.

MSDH reported Sunday that five deaths occurred between Oct. 5 and Oct. 10 in the following counties:

County Deaths reported Sunday
Lafayette 1
Leflore 1
Marion 1
Montgomery 1
Tate 1

New cases and deaths were reported to MSDH as of 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 10, and Sunday, Oct. 11. MSDH usually reports statistics on the COVID-19 coronavirus each day based on the previous day’s testing and death reports.

The primary metric concerning state health officials are the numbers of people hospitalized, and that number rose steadily with the rise of new cases in July and August. On June 6, the number of Mississippians hospitalized with confirmed cases of COVID-19 was at 358. Hospitalizations nearly tripled by late July. They leveled off in early August and began noticeably dropping in the middle of the month including critical cases and numbers of people requiring ventilators. Hospitalizations continued to drop in September but levelled off at the middle of the month. They continued to drop through Oct. 3; however, they began showing a definite rise last week.

The number of Mississippians hospitalized for the virus as of 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, is 600, about half of the late July peak of more than 1,200. The number includes 491 with confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 109 people with suspected but unconfirmed cases. Of those with confirmed infections, 136 were critically ill and in intensive care units and 59 were on ventilators.

Source: MSDH

MSDH has estimated the number of people who can be presumed recovered from COVID-19 in Mississippi. That number is 90,577 through Sunday, Oct. 4. This figure is updated weekly. It represents about 86% of the cumulative 105,228 cases reported Monday, Oct. 11.

The number of cases in Warren County three weeks ago, Monday, Sept. 21, was 1,381, therefore the estimated number of people presumed recovered in the county is 1,328, or about 90.3% of the 1,470 cumulative cases reported as of Monday, Oct. 11. The county has an estimated 89 active cases.

These estimates are based on MSDH’s guidelines for calculating estimated recoveries when hospitalizations are not known, using the number of cases 21 days ago, less known outcomes (deaths).

The total number of Mississippians tested for COVID-19 (PCR and antigen tests identifying current infections) as of Sunday, Oct. 3, is 863,957 or about 29% of the state’s 2.976 million residents. The positivity rate (positive results to tests, seven-day average) was 6.3% Sunday according to Johns Hopkins University. The national rate is 5%, and 5% or lower indicates adequate testing.

The total number of outbreaks in long-term care facilities is 126 Monday. About 40.1%, or 1,258, of the state’s total deaths were people in long-term care facilities.

A total of 25 deaths in Warren County were residents of LTC facilities.

MSDH is no longer reporting outbreaks in individual long-term care facilities in Mississippi and has replaced it with access to a database from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. You can access and search the data here. The latest data available is for the week ending Sept. 27.

For additional information, visit the MSDH website.

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Third spike in COVID-19 cases reported Saturday; seven-day average over 600

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With another spike of new COVID-19 cases Saturday, the third in a week, Mississippi’s seven-day average was above 600 for the first time in over a month, further indicating the state may be seeing the beginning of a new surge in cases. Hospitalizations have also continued to rise throughout the week.

The Mississippi State Department of Health reported eight new COVID-19 cases in Warren County Saturday and no new deaths. The cumulative number of cases in Warren County to date is 1,467, and the county’s death toll is 53.

Statewide, MSDH reported 957 new COVID-19 cases Saturday, bringing the total cumulative confirmed cases in Mississippi to 104,638. The seven-day average of new cases is 638, higher by 180 cases from a month ago.

Most new cases are seen in younger people recently, and they are more likely to survive the virus than those 65 and older. By far, the age group reporting the most cases in Mississippi are young people from 18 to 29 years old.

MSDH reported Saturday that 16 additional Mississippians died of COVID-19 statewide. The cumulative number of deaths in the state is 3,096. The state’s rate of deaths to confirmed cases is about 3%.

Deaths are a lagging indicator. While July saw the highest number of new cases since the crisis began, August saw the highest number of deaths. The highest number of deaths in any one day was 67 reported Aug. 25.

MSDH reported Saturday that 10 deaths occurred between Sept. 23 and Oct. 9 in the following counties:

County Deaths reported Saturday
Alcorn 1
George 1
Hancock 1
Montgomery 1
Panola 1
Stone 1
Tippah 1
Washington 2
Winston 1

Six COVID-19 related deaths occurred between Sept. 25 and Oct. 1 and were identified from death certificate reports.

County Deaths identified on death certificate reports
Desoto 1
Hinds 1
Lee 1
Madison 1
Panola 1
Scott 1

New cases and deaths were reported to MSDH as of 6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 9. MSDH usually reports statistics on the COVID-19 coronavirus each day based on the previous day’s testing and death reports.

The primary metric concerning state health officials are the numbers of people hospitalized, and that number rose steadily with the rise of new cases in July and August. On June 6, the number of Mississippians hospitalized with confirmed cases of COVID-19 was at 358. Hospitalizations nearly tripled by late July. They leveled off in early August and began noticeably dropping in the middle of the month including critical cases and numbers of people requiring ventilators. Hospitalizations continued to drop in September but levelled off at the middle of the month. They continued to drop through Oct. 3; however, they have shown a definite rise this week.

The number of Mississippians hospitalized for the virus as of 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, is 600, about half of the late July peak of more than 1,200. The number includes 491 with confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 109 people with suspected but unconfirmed cases. Of those with confirmed infections, 136 were critically ill and in intensive care units and 59 were on ventilators.

Source: MSDH

MSDH has estimated the number of people who can be presumed recovered from COVID-19 in Mississippi. That number is 90,577 through Sunday, Oct. 4. This figure is updated weekly. It represents about 86.6% of the cumulative 104,638 cases reported Saturday, Oct. 10.

The number of cases in Warren County three weeks ago, Saturday, Sept. 19, was 1,380, therefore the estimated number of people presumed recovered in the county is 1,327, or about 90.5% of the 1,467 cumulative cases reported as of Saturday, Oct. 10. The county has an estimated 87 active cases.

These estimates are based on MSDH’s guidelines for calculating estimated recoveries when hospitalizations are not known, using the number of cases 21 days ago, less known outcomes (deaths).

The total number of Mississippians tested for COVID-19 (PCR and antigen tests identifying current infections) as of Saturday, Oct. 3, is 863,957 or about 29% of the state’s 2.976 million residents. The positivity rate (positive results to tests, seven-day average) was 5.9% Friday according to Johns Hopkins University. The national rate is 4.9%, and 5% or lower indicates adequate testing.

The total number of outbreaks in long-term care facilities is 126 Saturday. About 40.5%, or 1,254, of the state’s total deaths were people in long-term care facilities.

A total of 25 deaths in Warren County were residents of LTC facilities.

MSDH is no longer reporting outbreaks in individual long-term care facilities in Mississippi and has replaced it with access to a database from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. You can access and search the data here. The latest data available is for the week ending Sept. 27.

For additional information, visit the MSDH website.

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Another spike in Mississippi’s new COVID-19 cases reported Friday

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On Friday, the seven-day average of new COVID-19 cases in Mississippi is almost 100 cases higher than it was a month ago, further indicating the state may be seeing the beginning of a new surge in cases. Hospitalizations have also continued to rise throughout the week.

The Mississippi State Department of Health reported seven new COVID-19 cases in Warren County Friday and no new deaths. The cumulative number of cases in Warren County to date is 1,459, and the county’s death toll is 53.

Statewide, MSDH reported 862 new COVID-19 cases Friday, bringing the total cumulative confirmed cases in Mississippi to 103,681. The seven-day average of new cases is 589, higher by nearly 100 cases from where it was a month ago.

Most new cases are seen in younger people recently, and they are more likely to survive the virus than those 65 and older. By far, the age group reporting the most cases in Mississippi are young people from 18 to 29 years old.

MSDH reported Friday that six additional Mississippians died of COVID-19 statewide. The cumulative number of deaths in the state is 3,080. The state’s rate of deaths to confirmed cases is about 3%.

Deaths are a lagging indicator. While July saw the highest number of new cases since the crisis began, August saw the highest number of deaths. The highest number of deaths in any one day was 67 reported Aug. 25.

MSDH reported Friday that six deaths occurred between Sept. 19 and Oct. 8 in the following counties:

County Deaths reported Friday
Bolivar 1
Desoto 2
Newton 1
Sunflower 1
Walthall 1

New cases and deaths were reported to MSDH as of 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 8. MSDH usually reports statistics on the COVID-19 coronavirus each day based on the previous day’s testing and death reports.

The primary metric concerning state health officials are the numbers of people hospitalized, and that number rose steadily with the rise of new cases in July and August. On June 6, the number of Mississippians hospitalized with confirmed cases of COVID-19 was at 358. Hospitalizations nearly tripled by late July. They leveled off in early August and began noticeably dropping in the middle of the month including critical cases and numbers of people requiring ventilators. Hospitalizations continued to drop in September but levelled off at the middle of the month. They continued to drop through Oct. 3; however, they have shown a definite rise this week.

The number of Mississippians hospitalized for the virus as of 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 7, is 606, about half of the late July peak of more than 1,200. The number includes 472 with confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 134 people with suspected but unconfirmed cases. Of those with confirmed infections, 139 were critically ill and in intensive care units and 66 were on ventilators.

Source: MSDH

MSDH has estimated the number of people who can be presumed recovered from COVID-19 in Mississippi. That number is 90,577 through Sunday, Oct. 4. This figure is updated weekly. It represents about 87.4% of the cumulative 103,681 cases reported Friday, Oct. 9.

The number of cases in Warren County three weeks ago, Friday, Sept. 18, was 1,366, therefore the estimated number of people presumed recovered in the county is 1,313, or about 90% of the 1,459 cumulative cases reported as of Friday, Oct. 9. The county has an estimated 93 active cases.

These estimates are based on MSDH’s guidelines for calculating estimated recoveries when hospitalizations are not known, using the number of cases 21 days ago, less known outcomes (deaths).

The total number of Mississippians tested for COVID-19 (PCR and antigen tests identifying current infections) as of Saturday, Oct. 3, is 863,957 or about 29% of the state’s 2.976 million residents. The positivity rate (positive results to tests, seven-day average) was 5.6% Thursday according to Johns Hopkins University. The national rate is 4.8%, and 5% indicates adequate testing.

The total number of outbreaks in long-term care facilities is 128 Friday. About 40.6%, or 1,249, of the state’s total deaths were people in long-term care facilities.

A total of 25 deaths in Warren County were residents of LTC facilities.

MSDH is no longer reporting outbreaks in individual long-term care facilities in Mississippi and has replaced it with access to a database from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. You can access and search the data here. The latest data available is for the week ending Sept. 27.

For additional information, visit the MSDH website.

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