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Sally expected to make landfall as a Category 2 hurricane

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Tropical Storm Sally Sept. 14 (Image source: NOAA)

Sally is still a tropical storm Monday morning but that could well change within the next 12 hours or so. By the time it hits the Louisiana and Mississippi Gulf Coast Tuesday morning, forecasters expect it will be a Category 2 hurricane.

The coast, from Morgan City, Louisiana, to Ocean Springs, Mississippi, is under a hurricane warning, meaning that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area. Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion.

Storm surge from the mouth of the Mississippi to Ocean Springs is expected to be from 7 to 11 feet, and from Ocean Springs to the Alabama border from 5 to 8 feet.

Sally is expected to be a slow-moving system as it approaches land producing 8 to 16 inches of rainfall with isolated amounts of 24 inches over portions of the central Gulf Coast from the western Florida Panhandle to far southeast Louisiana through the middle of the week. Life-threatening flash flooding is possible. In addition, this rainfall will likely lead to widespread minor to isolated major flooding on area rivers.

Sally is forecast to move farther inland early Wednesday and track into the Southeast with rainfall of 6 to 12 inches possible across portions of inland southeast Mississippi and Alabama. Significant flash and urban flooding is likely, as well as widespread minor to moderate flooding on some rivers.

Information from the National Hurricane Center.

COVID-19

Mississippi’s new COVID-19 cases continued to climb Wednesday; death reported in Warren County

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New COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations continued a steady climb Wednesday in Mississippi as they have been doing for more than 10 days.

The Mississippi State Department of Health reported five new COVID-19 cases Wednesday in Warren County and one new death, identified from a death certificate report. The cumulative number of cases in Warren County to date is 1,481, and the county’s death toll is 54.

Statewide, MSDH reported 876 new COVID-19 cases Wednesday, bringing the total cumulative confirmed cases in Mississippi to 106,817. The seven-day average of new cases is 654, higher by 241 cases from a month ago.

Most new cases are seen in younger people recently, and they are more likely to survive the virus than those 65 and older. By far, the age group reporting the most cases in Mississippi are young people from 18 to 29 years old.

MSDH reported Wednesday that 25 additional Mississippians died of COVID-19 statewide. The cumulative number of deaths in the state is 3,140. The state’s rate of deaths to confirmed cases is about 2.9%.

Deaths are a lagging indicator. While July saw the highest number of new cases since the crisis began, August saw the highest number of deaths. The highest number of deaths in any one day was 67 reported Aug. 25.

Of the 25 deaths MSDH reported Wednesday, nine occurred between Oct. 11 and Oct. 13 in the following counties:

County Deaths reported Wednesday
DeSoto 1
Jackson 1
Lamar 1
Lauderdale 1
Lincoln 1
Panola 1
Rankin 2
Washington 1

Sixteen COVID-19 related deaths occurred between July 28 and Oct. 8 and were identified from death certificate reports.

County Deaths identified from death certificate reports
Amite 1
Clay 1
Coahoma 1
DeSoto 1
Grenada 1
Hinds 1
Leflore 1
Lowndes 1
Marshall 1
Oktibbeha 1
Pearl River 1
Pontotoc 1
Smith 1
Tallahatchie 1
Warren 1
Washington 1

New cases and deaths were reported to MSDH as of 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 13. MSDH usually reports statistics on the COVID-19 coronavirus each day based on the previous day’s testing and death reports.

The primary metric concerning state health officials are the numbers of people hospitalized, and that number rose steadily with the rise of new cases in July and August. On June 6, the number of Mississippians hospitalized with confirmed cases of COVID-19 was at 358. Hospitalizations nearly tripled by late July. They leveled off in early August and began noticeably dropping in the middle of the month including critical cases and numbers of people requiring ventilators. Hospitalizations continued to drop in September but levelled off at the middle of the month. They continued to drop through Oct. 3; however, hospitalizations have been showing a definite rise since then.

The number of Mississippians hospitalized for the virus as of 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 12, is 600, about half of the late July peak of more than 1,200. The number includes 507 with confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 93 people with suspected but unconfirmed cases. Of those with confirmed infections, 145 were critically ill and in intensive care units and 69 were on ventilators.

Source: MSDH

MSDH has estimated the number of people who can be presumed recovered from COVID-19 in Mississippi. That number is 94,165 through Sunday, Oct. 11. This figure is updated weekly. It represents about 88.2% of the cumulative 106,817 cases reported Wednesday, Oct. 14.

The number of cases in Warren County three weeks ago, Wednesday, Sept. 23, was 1,384, therefore the estimated number of people presumed recovered in the county is 1,330, or about 89.8% of the 1,481 cumulative cases reported as of Wednesday, Oct. 14. The county has an estimated 97 active cases.

These estimates are based on MSDH’s guidelines for calculating estimated recoveries when hospitalizations are not known, using the number of cases 21 days ago, less known outcomes (deaths).

The total number of Mississippians tested for COVID-19 (PCR and antigen tests identifying current infections) as of Sunday, Oct. 3 (the latest date available from MSDH), is 863,957 or about 29% of the state’s 2.976 million residents. The positivity rate (positive results to tests, seven-day average) was 6.3% Sunday according to Johns Hopkins University. The national rate is 5.1%, and 5% or lower indicates adequate testing.

The total number of outbreaks in long-term care facilities is 127 Wednesday. About 40.4%, or 1,269, of the state’s total deaths were people in long-term care facilities.

A total of 25 deaths in Warren County were residents of LTC facilities.

MSDH is no longer reporting outbreaks in individual long-term care facilities in Mississippi and has replaced it with access to a database from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. You can access and search the data here. The latest data available is for the week ending Sept. 27.

For additional information, visit the MSDH website.

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Wade Carter remembered as a great football player who once shined for the Vikings

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(photo courtesy Kentora Burden)

Wade Carter, who died Friday, Oct. 9, is remembered as a great football player for the Warren Central Vikings.

Carter was a star linebacker for the Vikings in 2006, playing under WC’s former head coach Curtis Brewer. He was an outstanding player who helped lead the team to many victories in his high school days.

In 2007, Carter was selected to play in the Bernard Blackwell Classic by the Mississippi Association of Coaches because of his great senior season. He had finished the 2006 season with an impressive 113 tackles, leading the Viking’s defense.

Carter’s hard work on the field never went unnoticed, and he impressed many college scouts around Mississippi. A few months before graduation in 2007, Carter signed a football scholarship to play at Hinds Community College.

Carter died last week at the early age of 31 after being shot at LD’s Kitchen Oct. 6. A suspect, James Earl Winters, 29, remains at large.

Carter leaves behind plenty of family, friends and former teammates who will miss him dearly.

 

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Martin and Mosher inducted as ERDC Distinguished Civilian Employees

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Dr. William "Bill" Martin and Dr. Reed Mosher (photos courtesy ERDC)

The U.S. Army Engineering Research and Development Center will induct two former employees to the Waterways Experiment Station Gallery of Distinguished Civilian Employees Oct. 15 at 1 p.m. in the ERDC Headquarters Auditorium.

Dr. Bill Martin and Dr. Reed Mosher will join the ranks of more than 100 former employees whose significant career achievements left a lasting impression on both ERDC and the nation.

Martin and Mosher both served as directors of laboratories at the ERDC. Both pioneered technologies that proved to be life saving for American Soldiers and both left behind a remarkable legacy when they retired from federal service.

Each year, the ERDC inducts new members to the gallery, the highest honor bestowed to those who have worked at WES in Vicksburg.

Martin, a U.S. Army veteran, ended his 41-year ERDC career in 2013 as director of the Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory. In that role, he led a $90 million research program that provided cutting-edge technology solutions to more than 500 projects around the world. Martin was also instrumental in updating the lab’s world-class facilities, including the development of a state-of-the-art Ship Simulator Complex, which allows engineers and pilots to simulate ports, harbors and maritime environments all over the world.

Martin is also remembered for being a leader in addressing complex groundwater issues on military installations, as well as for leading a team that performed emergency modeling of the Sava River in Bosnia-Herzegovina in support of the 1st Armor Division’s peacekeeping role after the Balkan War. His team provided daily river condition forecasts and answered engineering questions for more than 450 consecutive days, which led to the creation of the WES Tele-Engineering Program. Today that program is known as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Reachback Operations Center, which is located in Vicksburg and connects deployed troops in the field to subject-matter experts back home who can help solve engineering challenges for them.

Mosher, who spent 40 years as a federal employee, retired as director of the Information Technology Laboratory  in 2018. Under his leadership, the lab’s staff grew by 108%, becoming the second largest ERDC laboratory. He also oversaw the construction of a 66,000 square-foot expansion to the laboratory, and his vision for a new secure computing facility is under construction and scheduled for completion later this year.

Before his ITL role, Mosher served as the lead technical director for military engineering in the Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory, where he was also directly involved with assessments after some of the world’s most notorious attacks and bombings — Oklahoma City in 1995, the U.S. Embassies in Africa in 1998 and the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on the Pentagon. He was instrumental in developing new technologies designed to protect soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan from rockets, mortars and other explosives.

Even after their retirements, both inductees are still involved with the ERDC today. Martin is a member and served as the 2019 president of the ERDC Alumni Association, while Mosher is the director of the Mississippi State University Institute for Systems Engineering Research, a partnership initiative with the ERDC.

 

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