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Hyde-Smith issues police week tribute, honors fallen Miss. officers

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(Courtesy press release of Hyde Smith)

In a press release, U.S. Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith issues a tribute to honor law enforcement during National Police Week:

 

HYDE-SMITH ISSUES POLICE WEEK TRIBUTE, HONORS FALLEN MISS. OFFICERS

 

Names of Fallen Officers Added to National Law Enforcement Memorial

VIDEO:  Hyde-Smith Issues Police Week Tribute.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.) today issued a National Police Week tribute to honor law enforcement officers and to recognize those Mississippi officers who died in the line of duty in 2020.

Hyde-Smith’s Congressional Record statement pays special attention to those Mississippians whose names have been added to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C.:  Monroe County Deputy Sheriff Dylan Scott Pickle, Simpson County Deputy Sheriff James Harold Blair, and Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Correctional Officer Marshall Lee London, Jr.

“To all the law enforcement officers across the state of Mississippi, I want to say to you that I am in Washington, D.C., as your Senator to support you and to work to ensure you have what you need to do your job.  You are truly our hometown heroes.  You are the thin blue line keeping our families and our communities safe,” Hyde-Smith said.

“To the families of Deputy Pickle, Deputy Blair, and Officer London, I know you have faced enormous loss.  I want you to know that you are continually in our prayers,” she said.

In addition to Pickle, Blair, and London, the names of DeSoto County Sheriff Deputies Henry R. Campbell, William C. Cooper, and Carter I. Jones have been added to the national memorial.  They lost their lives in the line of duty in May 1898.

Hyde-Smith’s National Police Week statement is available here:

Mr. President, it is a solemn honor to recognize National Police Week.  Each year, we dedicate this week to express our admiration and gratitude to all of the law enforcement officers working to keep us safe.  We also take this time to remember those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty over the past year.

 

Law enforcement officers face many challenges in their mission to protect and serve.  I greatly admire members of the law enforcement community who remain steadfast amidst the dangers of their noble profession.

 

To all the law enforcement officers across the state of Mississippi, I want to say to you that I am in Washington, D.C., as your Senator to support you and to work to ensure you have what you need to do your job.  You are truly our hometown heroes.  You are the thin blue line keeping our families and our communities safe.

 

The loss of any officer deeply affects entire communities beyond their own department, and the ramifications for their family and friends are heartbreaking.

 

This Police Week, we honor and mourn three heroes from Mississippi—officers who died in the line of duty last year.

 

Monroe County Deputy Sheriff Dylan Scott Pickle, 24, died on July 26, 2020, while on duty after a vehicle struck him during a safety checkpoint operation.  Dylan, a decorated veteran awarded three medals for his heroism in Syria, knew at an early age that he wanted to serve his community and his country.  An Amory native and an Itawamba Community College graduate, Deputy Pickle’s life of service was cut short soon after earning a promotion within the Sheriff’s Department.  He leaves behind his mother, a sister, a brother, and stepsister.

 

Simpson County Sheriff Deputy James Harold Blair lost his life on July 12, 2020, after a subject he was transporting fatally wounded him.  This 77-year-old grandfather served in law enforcement honorably for more than 50 years in Simpson County, Lincoln County, Pike County, and Louisiana.  He even worked as a crossing guard for his grandchildren’s school.  Deputy Sheriff Blair leaves behind a large grieving family, including his wife, three sons, four daughters, 17 grandchildren, and 48 great grandchildren. 

 

Correctional Officer Marshall Lee “Bem” London, Jr., 66, of the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office passed away May 18, 2020.  A 16-year veteran of the Sheriff’s office, Bem is among the tragic number of law enforcement officers who succumbed to COVID-19 last year while serving the public.  A dedicated family man, Deputy London is survived by his children and grandchildren.

 

As a lasting tribute, the names of these three brave officers will be added this year to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C.

 

In addition to these recent losses, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial will now also bear the names of three DeSoto County Sheriff’s deputies who died in the line of duty 123 years ago.  Deputy Sheriffs Henry R. Campbell, William C. Cooper, and Carter I. Jones lost their lives on May 18, 1898, while attempting to arrest a father and son wanted for four murders.  Even after more than a century, we still remember loss and honor their service.

 

Then and now, our law enforcement offices face tremendous dangers as they work to ensure the public safety and enforce the law.  Today, all officers must deal with unprecedented challenges, pressures, and scrutiny.  Supporting our law enforcement ought to be uncontroversial.  Unfortunately, that is not always the case.

 

As we mark National Police Week, let us embrace the memories of these fallen officers as a cause to redouble our commitment to supporting law enforcement.  I assure you that I will continue to be an advocate for law enforcement professionals and do my very best to honor the legacy of all those lost in the line of duty.

 

To the families of Deputy Pickle, Deputy Blair, and Officer London, I know you have faced enormous loss.  I want you to know that you are continually in our prayers.

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